Why our kids have lost faith in school (Part 2)

“The more things change, the more they stay the same”, it seems.

Fresco student

Boy reciting (Pompeii)

So, this is the education revolution? You could be excused for not noticing anything but a mild westerly breeze blowing in your face. If you are a student in a mainstream education, you might not have noticed anything at all, in fact.

The point I am trying to emphasise is that very little has come of the epiphany that occurred since Sir Ken Robinson’s ground-breaking TED presentation in February 2006. ‘Personalisation’ has become a generic catch phrase for anything that encompasses a variety of initiatives, from a wide range of options and elective courses offered by schools and districts with deep pockets, to students using their own electronic device (BYOD) in a formalised classroom setting. As laudable as these initiatives may be, they have, in actual fact, very little to do with personalisation. Allow me to explain …

Schools, like shopping malls, are expanding rapidly; state-of-the-art classrooms, art-and-media studios, and sports facilities abound. The only limit seems to be the extent of the capital campaign that the school’s community can muster … Those that have, get more, and those that don’t, well … they just don’t. Despite their struggles, these very communities often offer the highest level of personalisation. Continuing on with the analogy of an expanding shopping mall, clients may love the options and choice available to them (what I call ‘customisation’); but may long for the personalised level of service that the corner-store owner offered, before it was demolished to make place for the consumerist expanse.

What, and whom, do we serve? The students are our clients, and it would be useful to ask them a few questions:

  1. Does your teacher know you?
  2. Are you able to use your personal strengths to achieve the goals in any given course, or are you expected to do ‘the same’ as everyone else?
  3. Do you have a choice as to which content you would like to study in depth in any given course?
  4. Are you relying on tutors to help you get through your academic program?
  5. How many students should be in your classroom in order for your teacher to provide you with the personal attention you deserve?

In the midst of escalating levels of stress and pressures among our learners (the topic of the final post in this series), we do not seem to realise that ‘small is everything’ when it comes to education. Ask any teacher in any academic program whether he would rather teach 24 students or 12.

While we all may concur on the value of ‘personalisation’, it would be hugely beneficial if we could actually agree on what the concept actually means. Does it mean that we can just offer more courses along the same old lines; or does it mean something else entirely, something smaller and more … personal?


Comments

Why our kids have lost faith in school (Part 2) — 2 Comments

  1. I think that it might be that some teachers really want to personalise, but that they do not have the opportunity (due to issues such as large class sizes) to implement it. Therefore, it might seem to them that customising is the next-best option?

    • Thank you for your comment. I agree that most teachers understand the essence of personalisation but, as you have said, are unable to provide such a level of attention to their students. I wish to emphasize the fact that schools’ administration,boards and trustees are not giving this matter the attention it deserves. As you have said, class sizes are critical to providing the level of personalisation that our learners deserve. Customization costs money … lots of money and, with so many schools now standing empty, I would prefer that the funds spent on new (often unnecessarily ‘flashy’) facilities in over-populated schools rather be directed towards making a difference in the classroom; i.e. reducing the number of learners per teacher using the facilities that already exist. Do you have any suggestions on how to achieve this? Thank you very much for making a valuable contribution to this discussion!

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