Dialogue: Challenges and Change in Education

I have the great privilege to work with a forward-thinking organization, Action Canada.  A leadership program for young Canadians, Action Canada explores topics of national interest and investigates ways to make improvements for Canada’s future.  This year, their theme is:  … Continue reading

On the British Proposal of bringing the Armed Services into the School-system

In their article of 9 July in The Telegraph, the British shadow ministers for education and defence put forward the idea that the military (especially its veterans and reservists) ought to have a stronger role in the British education system. While this … Continue reading

On Pedagogy

I have known some teachers who, without realising it, saw their classroom as an accident of location. There is a classroom, in which there happens to be one knowledgeable adult amid a group of ignorant children. It almost goes without … Continue reading

Outward Bound Canada and Blyth Education: Sustainability for the 21st Century

Outward Bound (OB) has established itself as a pioneer in raising our collective consciousness about the world, developing self-awareness and leadership, and offering challenging programs of adventure and endurance. [pullquote]Time is not on our side, both personally and environmentally; we need … Continue reading

Tony Macoun: An Apology on Global Citizenship

I have been asked to share my perspectives on the interesting paper written by John Godfrey on the appropriateness of including “Global Citizenship” in our schools’ objectives.  Although I recognise that he makes many good points, I would like to … Continue reading

Realising the Revolution: Walk the Chalk

“You won’t believe it, but my mom told me that I can go on the New York trip.  She said that since this was my passion, they would support it.” A grade 10 student recently shared this exciting news with … Continue reading

Sir Ken Robinson: Making progressive education mainstream

At TEDx London, Sir Ken Robinson concluded the day’s conference with a poignant reminder: “The reason why today’s conversation is so important is that we are living in revolutionary times; that’s why we need a revolution in education”.

He identifies two major drivers of change, population growth and technology, both of which are changing exponentially …

“And that rate of change is going to accelerate; it’s not going to decrease …”

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Sir Ken Robinson: The Learning Revolution continues …

“The reason I think we need a revolution [in education] is really captured in a phrase you hear politicians often misuse. They talk about the need to ‘get back to basics’ in education; and, I think, we should. The problem, I think, is that many politicians, when they say “get back to basics”, seem to believe the basics are a group of subjects that they did when they were at school; and in particular, they tend to emphasise literacy and numeracy and science. Well, of course, they are fantastically important; but the basics of education are not a group of subjects. The basics in education are fundamental purposes …”

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